Tuesday, December 10, 2013

10 Critiques

Below are 10 critiques of photos from the ART 247 class.

This photo was taken by Riley Boyd at Basin Creek. Settings were f/4.5, 1/20", ISO-250. The longer shutter speed allowed for the water to start to blur, and the tripod kept the camera steady enough to keep the log and the ice crisp.  Overall, I think the photo is well exposed. I do think that the photo could have been framed/ cropped differently. The log is awkwardly close to the top of the frame. As the viewer traces the log in from the right, the eyes flow upward toward the green moss and then out of the frame, bypassing the beautifully lit ice crystals and rushing water. Giving more room in the frame above the log would help keep the viewers eyes in the frame, and hopefully get them to circle back down to the beauty below the log.

This photo was also taken by Riley Boyd at Mystic Lake. Settings were f/2.4, 1/980", ISO-?, HDR on. I am assuming that the low aperture is due to the limitations of the camera phone, and the high shutter speed was necessary to keep from over exposing due to the low aperture. Given the limitations of the camera, the product is impressive. The composition is great, utilizing division of thirds in the rocks and the tree line. The few rocks extending from shore into the lake draw the viewers eye inward, while the diagonals of the tree line draw attention to the mountains behind. I think this scene could make for great photo opportunities with a better camera. a longer exposure and higher aperture would give a greater depth of field, giving crispness to the mountains, while allowing some movement to be seen in the low clouds and fog. 

This photo, also taken by Riley Boyd, is a great example of night photography. Riley's settings were f/3.5, 30", ISO-3200, Manual Focus. These settings are probably the best possible within the restraints of the camera. I am impressed with how many stars the camera picked up. The only thing I would do differently is move the frame down to show some of the foreground in front of the liberty cap. I like the horizontal position of the cap, but I feel like it has been cut off because I cannot see the foreground. 

This photo of Mystic Lake was taken by Katharina Purgay. Her settings were f 11 1/100 sec ISO 200 20mm. These settings seem appropriate to me, especially if the shot was taken handheld. The photo is quite sound compositionally. The break in the trees on the far end of the lake falls about 1/3 from the left of the frame. The rocks lead the viewers eyes inward, similar to Riley's photo. My eyes tend to settle on the mountains in the background. It would be nice if there was some more clarity in the mountains, but the foggy aspect is nice too.

This photo was also taken by Katharina Purgay, in Yellowstone. Her settings were f 3.5 30 sec ISO 3200 20mm. These settings seem appropriate to me, especially to keep the stars bright without allowing them to start to trail and blur. Lighting up the Liberty Cap with the flashlight was very effective, giving an object of interest, but not detracting from the brilliance of the stars. I like the angle of the Liberty Cap, moving from lower left to upper right. However, I think it might be better if the cap was placed a little further to the right within the frame, giving more room on it's left side. 

This photo was also taken by Katharina Purgay. Her settings were f 16 1.3 sec ISO 100 18mm. The 1.3s exposure time allowed for blurry water, and the use of a tripod allowed for crisp rocks and ice. I like the black and white in the water, but it starts to loose contrast and clarity in the background. I think if the photo was taken from more of the middle of the stream, looking up toward the mountains rather than the opposite bank, there would be a lot more interesting layers to look at. Obviously this is a difficult and cold decision to make, and I ultimately made the same decision Katie did in this location. 

This photo was taken by Jon Brunn using the following settings: ISO 100, 80mm, f/4.5, 1/13 sec. The 1/13s shutter speed allowed for some blurring, especially around the edges. The low aperture adds to this effect. I love the effect it has in this photo, especially since the girls face is relatively clear. I don't know how well the photo fits for the subject matter of the class, but it is one of my favorite photos yet. 

This photo was taken by Anton Larsson in Yellowstone National Park. Anton's settings were: ISO 125 20.64mm f/11 1/125s. These settings seem appropriate for the most part, especially if the photo was handheld. The reflection is very full and vibrant. Compositionally, there is not a lot to complain about. The layers are nicely stacked. However, it seems like everything is very far away, and there is not really an object of interest. It would be nice if there were some rocks in the water closer up, to draw the viewers eye in. Throwing a rock into the water to create ripples may have worked as well. 

This photo was taken by Zach Witt with the following settings: ISO 200, f/11, 1/500s, 18mm. I think this is a great composition of color and line. The slabs of rock form lines that draw the viewers eye toward the center of the frame and into the more red and orange areas of the rock. The vertical lines in the background give balance and hold the viewers eyes in the frame. I think that the trees on the right hand side could be framed better, or else cropped out, to keep from distracting from the rest of the picture. 

This photo was taken by Tyler Reed with the following settings: ISO: 100 F/5 1/500sec. 22mm. I really like the gray trees in contrast with the blue sky and clouds. The tallest tree is nicely placed in the frame, using the division of thirds. It may have been better to use a higher Aperture,  to get a greater depth of field. This would require a longer shutter speed, but I think that would be doable, even hand held. 

Tuesday, December 3, 2013

30 Final Photos

Below are 30 photos I took this semester. All photos were taken with a Cannon Rebel and one of two lenses: and 18-55mm, or a 75-300mm. All photos were taken using manual settings and were edited in either Lightroom or iPhoto. The most common adjustments included cropping, adjusting clarity, vibrance, temperature, and applying graduated neutral density filters. Individual settings are listed below the photos.
ISO: 100
Focal Length: 55mm
f/8.0
1/25s
ISO: 100
Focal Length: 23mm
f/9.0
1/40s
ISO: 100
Focal Length: 24mm
f/22
1/4s
ISO: 100
Focal Length: 23mm
f/16
1/10s
ISO: 100
Focal Length: 27mm
f/25
1.3s
ISO: 100
Focal Length: 25mm
f/25
0.6s
ISO: 100
Focal Length: 18mm
f/22
0.4s
ISO: 100
Focal Length: 75mm
f/9.0
1/80s
ISO: 100
Focal Length: 95mm
f/10
1/80s
ISO: 100
Focal Length: 18mm
f/10
4.0s
ISO: 100
Focal Length: 21mm
f/22
1/20s

ISO: 100
Focal Length: 34mm
f/29
1/40s
ISO: 100
Focal Length: 29mm
f/22
1/160s
ISO: 100
Focal Length: 20mm
f/22
1/6s
ISO: 100
Focal Length: 95mm
f/6.3
1/125s
ISO: 100
Focal Length: 120mm
f/5.6
1/200s
ISO: 400
Focal Length: 33mm
f/14
1/20
ISO: 100
Focal Length: 55mm
f/20
1/8
ISO: 400
Focal Length: 260mm
f/5.6
1/250
ISO: 200
Focal Length: 300mm
f/5.6
1/500
ISO: 100
Focal Length: 230mm
f/5.0
1/800
ISO: 100
Focal Length: 45mm
f/7.1
1/200
ISO: 100
Focal Length: 18mm
f/20
1/8
ISO: 200
Focal Length: 18mm
f/10
5.0s
ISO: 200
Focal Length: 18mm
f/10
1/5
ISO: 100
Focal Length: 18mm
f/10
4.0s
ISO: 100
Focal Length: 18mm
f/20
1/8s
ISO: 400
Focal Length: 300mm
f/5.5
1/100s
ISO: 400
Focal Length: 300mm
f/5.6
1/320s
ISO: 100
Focal Length: 130mm
f/5.0
1/320s
ISO: 200
Focal Length: 230mm
f/5.0
1/500s


Tuesday, November 26, 2013

Critique

1. This photograph shows the movement of fog over a ridge line, presumably in the morning or evening. The trees are sharp, while the fog is blurred (70 second exposure) to show movement. I like the warm colors and (mostly) sharp trees. I think that the sky and trees are slightly over exposed - probably due to the long exposure.

2. This photograph has great clarity and sharpness on the coral, and the sky and water have a similar blue, giving repetition throughout the frame. Due to the 67 second exposure, the foreground is very blurry, and rather distracting in my opinion. The photo could also be cropped to show a little more on the left hand side, as it looks like a rock was cut off right before it would have naturally ended. This photo may have been better in landscape, though it is hard to know without seeing the scene in person.

3. This photograph is definitely a great action shot. The squirrel is crisp and sharp, with the exception of the tail and hind feet. This could be solved by increasing the f/stop slightly. The colors are very constant throughout, giving warm greens and browns. The background is blurred, keeping the viewers attention on the squirrel. However, the branch is blurred just enough to distract the viewer. This also could be salved with an adjustment of the f/stop. The shutter speed used was 1/1600, which could possibly be decreased slightly to allow for a higher f/stop.

Thursday, November 21, 2013

Missing Home

I haven't been home for a year now, and for the first time, I am really starting to feel homesick. In a some moments of nostalgia, I rediscovered the photos that first got me excited about photography. In high school I started fooling around with my dad's 35mm Nikon film camera, and got addicted to the challenge of building compositions and capturing fleeting light. I quickly learned that film was only getting more expensive, and decided I would put the camera down and save up for a digital. Now that I have my digital, I am actually impressed with how well I did with the film camera. The image quality is low on some of these, but they are fun to look at none the less.





Thursday, November 14, 2013

Screen Calibration

For my submission for the student art show, I decided to print this black and white photo of Peterson Lake.  After a few phone calls, I finally found a place that would print my photo in the wide 16x9 format. However, when I picked up my print, I was slightly appalled at how dark it had printed.
I brought the photo home and compared it to the on screen representation on my macbook. I estimated that the printed photo was 1.5 stops darker than the on screen representation. After some research I have learned that screen calibration is probably the source of my problem. Unfortunately, external hardware is required to accurately calibrate your monitor. However, I suppose that if photography is something I will continue with any sense of seriousness, It may be worth my while. This link describes the steps necessary in using screen calibrating software and hardware.
http://digital-photography-school.com/how-to-calibrate-your-monitor

The calibration package runs used in the description above runs about $180 according to DTGweb.com. This could possibly be a future investment.

Thursday, November 7, 2013

A Visit to God's Country

Over fall break, I took a much needed weekend away from Rocky, and drove 7 hours up to Big Sky Bible Camp, in Big Fork, Montana. As mentioned in one of my earlier posts, this is one of the most beautiful places I have been. It is impossible for me to look around this area of the state and even flirt with the thought that there isn't a Creator. A few resulting photos are below. However, No matter how good of a photographer you are, I don't think digital sensors will ever do this creation justice.
At the dam
Early Morning on Peterson Lake

Sunset Drill

Thursday, October 10, 2013

Red Lodge

Because the Yellowstone trip is canceled, I am working on some alternatives for shooting this weekend. The weather looks like it will be decent in Red Lodge on Saturday, so I am planning to go down there Friday night. Hopefully I can get there early enough for some sunset shots, and then get up early saturday morning for some good cloudy sunrises and mountains. Hopefully saturday can be a relaxing in my friend's cabin, and hanging at Red Lodge Coffee Factory Rosters:)